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Altered high-density lipoprotein composition and functions during severe COVID-19

Abstract : Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is affecting millions of patients worldwide. The consequences of initial exposure to SARS-CoV-2 go beyond pulmonary damage, with a particular impact on lipid metabolism. Decreased levels in HDL-C were reported in COVID-19 patients. Since HDL particles display antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and potential anti-infectious properties, we aimed at characterizing HDL proteome and functionality during COVID-19 relative to healthy subjects. HDLs were isolated from plasma of 8 severe COVID-19 patients sampled at admission to intensive care unit (Day 1, D1) at D3 and D7, and from 16 sex-and age-matched healthy subjects. Proteomic analysis was performed by LC-MS/MS. The relative amounts of proteins identified in HDLs were compared between COVID-19 and controls. apolipoprotein A-I and paraoxonase 1 were confirmed by Westernblot analysis to be less abundant in COVID-19 versus controls, whereas serum amyloid A and alpha-1 antitrypsin were higher. HDLs from patients were less protective in endothelial cells stiumalted by TNFα (permeability, VE-cadherin disorganization and apoptosis). In these conditions, HDL inhibition of apoptosis was blunted in COVID-19 relative to controls. In conclusion, we show major changes in HDL proteome and decreased functionality in severe COVID-19 patients.
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Submitted on : Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 9:18:26 AM
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Floran Begue, Sébastien Tanaka, Zarouki Mouktadi, Philippe Rondeau, Bryan Veeren, et al.. Altered high-density lipoprotein composition and functions during severe COVID-19. Scientific Reports, Nature Publishing Group, 2021, 11, pp.2291. ⟨10.1038/s41598-021-81638-1⟩. ⟨hal-03129740⟩

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