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Journal Articles American Journal of Plant Sciences Year : 2020

Optimisation of the Postharvest Treatment with Thymol to Control Mango Anthracnose

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Abstract

Anthracnose, caused by the fungus called Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is the main postharvest disease that affects mango production on Reunion Island. Fruits for the export market are always treated with chemicals. The use of chemical treatment is not in adequation with consumer expectations, and the increasing emergence of fungicide-resistant isolates promotes the development of alternatives methods. The principal objective of this work was to use antimicrobial properties of thymol as an alternative postharvest treatment on mango. Thymol diluated in a penetrating agent solution was effective on mango anthracnose. At a concentration of 0.025%, Thymol limited necrosis development due to pathogens during fruit storage. This treatment can stimulate some of polyphenols biosynthesis involved in the fruit resistance to postharvest disease, particularly the synthesis of gallic acid and resorcinol. With this final concentration of 0.025% thymol, the treatment did not affect fruit maturation and quality, especially the peel colour and sugar content. Importantly, the treatment did not show any detectable effect on organoleptic qualities of the fruit.
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Origin : Publication funded by an institution

Dates and versions

hal-03108806 , version 1 (13-01-2021)

Licence

Attribution - CC BY 4.0

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Marc Chillet, Jérôme Minier, Mathilde Hoarau, Jean-Christophe Meile. Optimisation of the Postharvest Treatment with Thymol to Control Mango Anthracnose. American Journal of Plant Sciences, 2020, 11, pp.1235 - 1246. ⟨10.4236/ajps.2020.118087⟩. ⟨hal-03108806⟩
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